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Goals | 20 min

Video: Goal Setting Strategies

Video: Goal Setting Strategies

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Video Transcript

Lauren Scholtz: Hi, I’m Lauren. I’m from customer success at intelliHR and I’m sitting on the couch here today with Tony Meredith from Tony Meredith coaching.

Tony Meredith: Hi Lauren, how are you? Thanks for having me.

Lauren: Fantastic. Thanks for coming in.

Tony: That’s okay. Not a problem.

Lauren: So I thought we’d start with a bit of a mandatory introduction. So if you want to tell us a little bit about you and, and what you do.

Tony: Sure. So Lauren, I’m a business coach. I’ve got my own business, Tony Meredith coaching. And I specialize in sales, leadership and mindset in particular with small businesses. I believe there’s a huge gap with small businesses. I have a big business background and I want to help small businesses because there’s such a disconnect between you know, what big businesses get, they’re afforded the training, et cetera. The small businesses, you know, it’s a massive opportunity. And so, you know, how do we bridge that gap? How do we make it easier for small businesses to succeed because it’s hard. You know, a lot of people go into small businesses because they want to be their own boss and they want freedom of time and they want more money. And the reality is that they have less time, less money, and work longer hours. And so it’s about, well, how do we help small businesses become more efficient, more effective?

Lauren: Well, that’s fantastic.

Tony: Thank you.

Lauren: And you know, looking on your bio online, you said that one of the things that you do is to kind of help business people get out of their own way.

Tony: Correct. Hundred percent.

Lauren: Fascinating. What does that mean?

Tony: So it means mind first, then strategy, right? And so I believe that to be successful in anything there’s a little formula and a 10% of it comes from knowledge. And that is you have the knowledge to do something. Now there’s a Chinese proverb, which is to know and not to do, is to not know at all. So you could have the knowledge, the few don’t act on the knowledge, then what does it really matter? And so then 15% comes from skills. So you could know something, you could read it in a book or watch a YouTube clip on it. But just because you know about it doesn’t mean you’re going to be good at it. So you need to have some skills to be able to take action on the thing that you know. So I believe that’s about 15%, but then the remaining 75% comes from your mindset, your psychology, your attitude. So you can know something, you’re gonna have the skills to do something. But if you’re inside your own head, if you have a fear of this or doubt of that then that’s going to prevent you from doing whatever it is that you want to achieve. And so I say mine first strategy because you can have the most well laid out strategy in the world, but if you have a fear of being criticized by the people, a fear of failure, perhaps a fear of success, have all these doubts going on, all these other limiting beliefs, it doesn’t matter what your strategy says, you’re not going to do it.

Lauren: Fair enough. That’s a very good thing to be helping people.

Tony: Absolutely. Cool.

Lauren: That sounds like we’ve got a little bit in common I suppose in our roles that we do. So as a customer success manager at intelliHR, basically once our customers decide that our products the right thing for them and our solution is going to help them with their business. My job is to then teach typically system administrators, how to get the most out of that plan, how to get, you know, make workplaces better one by one. And, you know, I love what you were saying about, you know, the skills and the knowledge and then having the right mindset to get things done. You know, those all sound like the perfect ingredients for goals, which is what we’re gonna be talking about today.

Tony: It’s a lovely segway, Lauren.

Lauren: Awesome. So you know, talking about goals you know, it’s definitely a conversation that I’ll have with leaders within the businesses when we’re doing our implementation is, you know, a lot of the questions that they have are things like, well, how do I help my people to set good goals? You know, it might be that their business has never really talked about goals before or that they had them a long time ago that no one’s really done anything about them. So you know, from your point of view, how do you help someone set a really good goal?

Tony: Sure. So the first thing I want to say is that if you don’t set a goal, if you aim at nothing, that’s what you get. You get nothing. Right? And so it’s about having something to aim at. I describe it as your North star, a beacon, whatever it might be. And the process that I use, I actually got from Stephen Covey, who wrote the book seven habits of highly effective people. Yeah. And chapter two he talks about begin with the end in mind. Now in that book, he’s talking about your life and he’s talking about your eulogy. But this more applies from a goal setting point of view. It’s about begin with the end in mind being, if you set a 12 month goal, then the end is that 12 month mark. Or if you set a six month goal, then it’s a six month mark. So begin with the end in mind. Where do you want to be at a point in time, in the future. So in your business, what level of sales do you want to achieve? And we’re just at the start of 2020 so what level of sales do you want to have achieved by the 31st of December, 2020 or if you work in financial year use what level of sales do you want by the 30th of June 2020 that’s the end, right? That’s the end in mind. And then once you’ve established what it is that you want, then you work backwards from there. But one of the hardest things is actually to figure out what it is that you want.

Lauren: Yeah, it is.

Tony: You know, and so you take, it’s about take the time, right? A lot of people won’t take the time to sit down and actually figure out what it is that they want. Right. And so it’s as simple as make some time, go wild with it, you know, get a whiteboard or get the team together and be creative. What are the things that you really want to achieve either individually or in your business this year? And my other things is that we have a whole lot of limitations when we do that, right? So why couldn’t possibly do that? Right? And so I don’t, but this is because we have these limiting beliefs, right? And so we have limiting beliefs based on, you know, fears from our childhood. It might be something our parents said to us. It might be something from our peers. It could be we saw something on the news. Perhaps these are creating limiting beliefs. Maybe we had a failure in the past and because we had that in the past, we believe that we’ll always have that value into the future. And so there’s a whole range of reasons why people would have limiting beliefs. But when you want to go and set goals, you want to look to take those limits away and, and challenge yourself and go, what is it that I really do want? In a perfect world? What would that look like? And be a bit wild with it. And you don’t want to focus so much on the how do I get there? Because the how I get there and how I accomplish it will come down the track. It’s more about just start with what is it that you want to, we’ll work our way through a process to pressure test the goal because you might say, well I want to have a business that’s doing $1 million, but if you’re not prepared to do the things that are going to get you to $1 million, then your goal is going to be incongruent with your actions. And so it’s all about coming up with your goal, but then also figuring out what are the things that I need to do to actually ensure that I deliver on that million dollar objective or whatever it might be.

Lauren: Brilliant. And a lot of our HR professionals, which is kind of the main people that I speak to, they’re in quite a unique position where they need to be getting people excited about setting these goals and motivated to achieve them, but they aren’t the person that this this employee reports through to. So it’s kind of you know, how do you get people excited about setting goals and make sure that those things are happening? If you’re not the person that’s probably going to be working with them on the goals day to day. Sure.

Tony: So it’s about working with the individual to say, what is it that you want in your career? What are the things that you want in your career when you’re with this particular business? Obviously your business has a overarching top-down goals, business objectives, whether it be in sales or minimising of way store, you know, minimising you know, workplace health and safety incidents, whatever it might be. Whatever that area is, there’s goals that are top down goals. But as an individual how can you align your own goals to the businesses now, not always possible. I understand that, but it’s about how can I align as best I can to what the businesses objectives are as well and how can I ensure that I’m able to add value, not only to the business, but to myself,

Lauren: I really liked the idea of alignment that you were talking about because that is definitely something that, you know, in larger organisations it’s not, it’s not just about, you know, what is mine or star, what do I personally want to achieve in my job? You know, people are there to do a job in an organisation. It’s kind of got its own goals as well. So that alignment is really helpful. One of our customers, one of our oldest ones at the school that we work with and something that they did with goals. They use the goal setting feature in our system and they’ve set, they’ve got five different categories of goals and they’ve got it set up so that everyone in the organisation can only choose from those five categories. Right. So right from, you know, the principal of the school or right the way through to the teaching staff, to the office staff. Everyone’s got goals based on innovative practice. They’ve got ones based on teamwork, I think operational and strategic development. Yep. Perfect. What do you think of that? Is that something that would be effective?

Tony: Great! Well it narrows down the focus? Right. which is fantastic because again, we need to remember that the business or the organisation, they have their own goals, right? And you need to align to those. And perhaps if you’re too wide from a business point of view and offer too much choice, then maybe it’s going to be hard to narrow something down. But those sorts of things there that you talk about with the teamwork or innovative practice or whatnot, it doesn’t matter what job that you hold within that business, there’ll be something that you can incorporate around teamwork. There’ll be something that you can incorporate around innovative practice, right? And it’s, but it’s about recognising that the job that I do doesn’t matter what level of the hierarchy you’re in. The job that I do, there are opportunities for me to improve my ability to be a better team player or to come up with more innovative solutions. And you know, great example is that regardless of what you do, I always encourage people to ask themselves is what I do the best way of doing it right? And, You know, in 2020 there are so many more new innovations happening all the time. Right? And so, and when you guys are incredibly innovative organisation, but with that task that you’re doing or that role that you’re doing, can I improve in certain areas with that? Why am I just accepting? Because it’s always been done this way. Why do I need to accept that into the future? You don’t. Right. And so that’s an opportunity then for people to put forth, take some ownership of your role and put forward some suggestions. Now this also needs to come from a, an organisation that’s prepared to welcome on that feedback, right? And foster that feedback, empower the staff to provide those sorts of suggestions. But wow, what a wonderful opportunity. If I was an employee and able to have a say in the role that I do, that is A I feel like I’m adding more value to the business. I’m getting a chance for me to be heard. I think it’s really exciting.

Lauren: It is a good feeling that you’re creating value for the business, that you fit in. That you’re a sort of aligned.

Tony: Yeah, you know, I mean, I’m an entrepreneur. That’s what I do. But there’s also options. Not everyone wants to go out and do what I’ve done and leave a corporate job and start your own business. And I, and I respect that. So there’s opportunities now for people to be intrepreneurs, you know, that is, I have an entrepreneurial flair, but I work within an organisation. And what are the things that I can do that are a little bit entrepreneurial but within my business, and again, that requires a culture you know, from the top down, that’s where culture starts. A culture that encourages people to put forth wonderful ideas and challenge the status quo and you know, look to stretch and, and grow both as an individual but also as an organisation.

Lauren: Fantastic. All right. So a bit of change of pace new year, 2020. You know, I was at your disrupt speech last year and it was fantastic. Really excited. And one of the things that you said was that, you know, is it 85% of new years resolutions usually crash and burn by about the end of January? Yeah. So did you set any new year’s resolutions?

Tony: No, I set goals all year round. Right. And so I’m not a big, hey, it’s the new year because I’ve got big goals for myself. Right. And so society says set a new year’s resolution. I don’t know, I just, I’m constantly challenged myself. Yes. I’ve got big goals for my business this year, whether it be my financial goals, I want to spend more time on stage and you know, impact more people. You know, I just introduced us in Sydney this last weekend. I introduced a new program that I’m going to be rolling out, so I’m in Brisbane this weekend and selling that. So yeah. So I’m going to be doing more of those sorts of things, but you know, I am constantly setting goals and challenging myself, so I’m not a new years resolution person, but, but yeah. You know, so what is something I’d like to do personally? I’d like to lose a bit more weight. You know, so I lost a bit of weight a few years ago and I’ve been enjoying a good time at very focused on my business and it’s something I’d like to do, but I haven’t set myself a resolution. You know, persé. Then I want to, I’ve been focusing on rolling out my program and now that I rolled that out for the first time last weekend, now it’s about switching focus to incorporating some, you know, some weight loss in there as well. Or just, you know, just being, being healthy generally. But you’re right. So people, you know, they get to that second week, that third week of January, and they do, it happens because I do it for the wrong reasons. And so one of the reasons I touched on it is because society says it on the 1st of January, you must set a goal, A new year’s resolution. Well, maybe that’s not right for you. Or maybe, you know, so there’s other times that you could do it or maybe you’re only setting it because society says, you know, and so that’s not a deep enough reason, right? You need to be not at all, not a good North star. It’s not at all. Right. And so it’s about being deeply connected to that thing that you want to achieve for yourself. The best question to ask is why do I want to achieve it? You know, so spend a lot of time on the why is it so it’s one thing to have a what. Hey, I want to have a business that delivers $1 million. Or hey, I want to lose some weight, or whatever it might be. Why do you want to do that?

Lauren: Well that makes me feel a whole lot better cause I did not set any new year’s resolutions this year. I’ve listened to your speech and went, right. There’s, you know, I’ll just keep doing the things that I’ve been doing. And you know, that’s all on track working well for me.

Tony: And that’s what it’s about. You know, it’s about just because society says you’re still setting goals, right?

Lauren: Oh yeah. It’s more of a dynamic process though. You know, I took that one off.

Tony: That’s it. And that’s perfect. Right. But it’s just that the majority of people tend to use news resolution as their time because the reality is they’re not setting goals for the rest of the year. So at least they’re attempting to set goals once, once a year being that time. But unfortunately, because of that approach, then they’re all, it’s all falling apart the second or third week in January. And you know, here we are. So it’s because you know, falling over because it’s not linked to purpose. Perhaps it’s because they’re too big goals. That is, I’m going from here and I want to climb a mountain or do something that’s quite extreme. That’s a reason perhaps I’m trying to do too many things. It’s, Hey, I want to get that promotion and get $1 million and climb a mountain and get a new partner. All these things, right. And you know, Bill Gates famously talks about people will overestimate what they can do in one year and underestimate what they can do in 10 years. And it’s a, it’s a timely time to talk about that quote because we’re at the start of a new decade. And so, you know, we’ve got 10 years ahead of us in this decade. And if people take a more methodical and measured approach to achieving their goals over the next decade, then they will find that come 2030 that they will have accomplished an enormous amount as opposed to trying to jam it all into 2020 falling short in the majority of those goals or all of those goals. And then when you fall short with all of your goals, how do you feel?

Lauren: You feel dreadful not inclined to set new ones?

Tony: Right? And so it’s like, well, I don’t feel good about it and so I’m just not going to bother and I’m just going to go on meander through life. And then on the 1st of January, 2021 ah yes, that’s right, I’ve got to set these goals and I reactivate about myself as opposed to setting goals in a more measured and methodical fashion. So, so that’s a, that’s another reason. You know, we talked about the fact that you’re setting, people fall over because of fears. So they don’t achieve their goals because they have a fear, a fear of failure, a fear of being criticized by the people. You know, fear of not doing the things that they want to do. Perhaps the people around them preventing them from achieving their goals, which is a big one. Perhaps I don’t have an accountability partner to help me through the goals. It’s not easy to accomplish goals and achieve, achieve your goals. So it’s about, is there someone around you that can help you, that you can be your buddy to help you through and you know, whether it be in a work setting, you know, having team meetings and creating that culture where we’re all in the boat together and, and having often regular feedback. Absolutely correct. Correct. Absolutely right. And so there’s all these types of things that, you know, if you don’t have some of those systems in place, then you won’t achieve the goal for yourself. So know it’s about recognising your environment. So what’s happening around you? I touched on before the whole, you know, friends, people you know, and Jim Rowan, he’s, he’s passed away now, but a very famous guru in the personal development space talks about you’re the average of your five closest people. Now, I believe it’s broader than that. I believe it’s, you’re the average of your entire network. But nonetheless, the people around you will have a very large determining factor as to whether or not you’re successful. If people around you are negative perhaps you know, throwing stones at your ideas or putting you off or saying, don’t do that, that’s too scary. All those types of things well, you won’t do it.

Lauren: No it doesn’t really help you feel courageous.

Tony: It doesn’t. And sadly it comes from the people that love us the most, right? It comes from parents or family members and and they do that because they want, they think they want to keep us safe, right? They don’t want us to fall over and make mistakes and I get that. But mistakes equals learning equals growth. And not everybody has that mindset.

Lauren: I can attest to not wanting people around you or that you care about to get hurt. You know, like I was talking to you about before, you know, I’ve got a one year old and he’s exploring everything. You know, he wants to eat everything. He wants to climb everything. And you know, there’s, I’m torn right down the middle between, I want him to have all these experiences and to grow and to stay out of his way so that he can do that. I don’t want him to hurt himself. I want him to, you know, get scared or break himself or, yeah. So, yeah. You know, there is that really sort of a balance that you’ve got to find.

Tony: Oh, it’s, it’s this internal tension. Yes. It’s an internal tension. Yes, it is. It is. You know, it is, and it’s not easy. Right? And as, as a parent of two kids, it, my kids are a bit older but it’s not easy. Right? Parenting is, is incredibly challenging. Right? And you know, you’re dealing with little people who have their own little personalities and you know, and, and I’ve got two kids and they’re two very different kids who I can’t use the same method of the one Parenthood, you know, child number one to the same as child number two because they’re different and given it’s your first, you’ve never parented before, so you.

Lauren: I don’t know what I’m doing.

Tony: Right. That’s right.

Lauren: That’s not a good thing to say on camera though.

Tony: I mean, the reality is that you’ve never parented it before. No. And so you can read a book, you can have all the theoretical knowledge in the world, you can watch a YouTube clip, etcetera. But it’s still, you roll the sleeves up and get down and do that thing. And in this instance it’s parenting. But in a work, example, it could be trying a new task or, or whatever it might be until you actually get on the field is when you have the true growth and, and you’re going to make a number of mistakes. And as a parent, as an employee, you need to accept that you are not going to get it right. And that’s okay because if you have a growth mindset that says, well, I’m going to make mistakes, but I’m going to learn from those mistakes. I’m going to be better tomorrow than I am today as a result of it. And then that’s about constantly progressing in a forward direction.

Lauren: So make sure that the mindset’s working while the skills and the knowledge part catches up kind of thing.

Tony: A hundred percent a hundred percent right. And again, then the knowledge, you can have all the knowledge in the world, right? But it’s not until you actually get on the field and become a parent or do a particular role in your job that you actually start to get some real life experience, some real life feedback as to how you’re going. And then we do plenty of stuff that you do really well, which is awesome. And you want to recognise that, right? And also, there’ll be stuff that you go, yeah, you know, I, I would’ve liked to have done that differently.

Lauren: Next time I would do this.

Tony: Absolutely. You know, but this comes down to I have to, as a, as a coach, I have two questions that I always ask all of my clients at the start of every meeting. And that is what went well and what could you do differently? And so maybe we haven’t seen each other for two weeks. And so you want to ask the question, what went well? Because if I asked the question of someone, how are you going naturally our natural disposition, this is a generalisation, is to rattle off all the things that have gone wrong, all the negative stuff as opposed to I deliberately say, what did you do well? What are the things that are going well for you in the last two weeks? What have you done well right now? We’ll get a chance to go through the, Hey, what would you like to do different? We’ll get to that 100% but it’s about what are the things that you have done well, and that doesn’t just have to be in a coaching setting. So we can all do that as individuals in our jobs on a daily basis or at the end of the day. Now I say to people at the end of the day, do some reflection, right? It might be for a minute, right? Ask yourself today, what did I do well? What were the things that I’m really proud of that I do today? Great, okay, I did that, blah, blah, blah. But then also say, well, what is it that I could improve on? What would I do differently if I had my time over? Ryan? And again, this comes down to taking the time to reflect on how we’ve gone today, not with a view of dwelling on things that have gone wrong and missed opportunities and woe, woe is me. It’s about going, okay, well that happened. Yeah, that didn’t end up the way that I thought it would. But next time that happens, here’s what I’ve learned from that experience. And if you do that regularly enough, then you’re starting to get more attuned to you and you’re starting to become more conscious around the things that you’re doing and you give yourself a choice then to change The better.

Lauren: It sounds like a really good habit to be developing. And I was just thinking it could really apply well for managers helping their people, you know, to achieve goals. Yeah. You know, there’s always talk about, you know, a great manager is actually a great coach. You know, someone who they can see the potential in the person, they can help them set those goals, but then they’re the one that helps them to achieve it. Cool. It helps them to find it within themselves to achieve it. Oh, exactly. So, you know, as a manager you could ask those two questions of, of your people.

Tony: And that’s where I got it from. Right. So I’m not going to sit here and say that I invented this. So I used to be a sales manager in a previous life and we would go in and visit fast moving consumer goods outlets and at the end of the call rather than diving to, well, my opinion is blah, blah, blah. I would always ask the sales rep what went well? Hey, we’ve just finished the call. Tell me what went well, great. This went that went, Oh, but this one, no, no, no, no, no. We’ll get to that. What went well? Then once I’ve done that, then I say, okay, what would you have done differently? Right? And they go through, here’s the things that I’ll do differently. And typically the things that I would do differently is a longer list than than what I went well, particularly early on. Once people got used to working with me and the questions that I was asking them, then we started to have more on the what went well column, but early on there’s going to be a lot more in the Hey, what did I do wrong?

Lauren: It’s a default setting isn’t it?

Tony: It’s a default setting, right? And then as a manager, once the employee or the sales rep in that instance said what they went well, what they would improve, then I would provide my feedback and give the, give the individual a chance to become self aware. Because when you have self-awareness, you still have a choice. Right? So just because you are self aware of something that you do, doesn’t mean that you will go and change it, but at least you’re now aware of it. Right. Whereas the majority of our day we operate from a subconscious position that is, we’re not even aware of half the things.

Lauren: You’re in it, you’re not looking at it.

Tony: Yeah. Yeah. Correct. And the example that I use often, I used it on the weekend in my presentation I use it often is when, and I’ll ask you directly, Lauren, so when are you driving along and someone cuts you off in their vehicle what do you do?

Lauren: You just have this moment of shock usually and then, well, I’m, I’m working on it now because there is usually some language that comes out to.

Tony: Like I said, it’s language, there’s frustration, there’s anger, there’s probably clenching of, you know, maybe in some instances know people are flipping birds, all those types of things. Right? But we’re doing that in an instant and we’re doing that because that’s our default. And so then the opportunities at the end of the day to sit back and reflect and what went well, but then this in this instance, what would I like to do differently next time? So perhaps when you reflect on that that incident you go, huh, yeah. Okay, well next time I do that I’d like to be more calm, about it. I’d like to breathe a little bit more. Am I safe? Yes. Is my baby safe? Yes. Is my car you know, unscaved yes. Maybe it’s added two seconds onto my trip. So what. You know what I mean? So you take a more correct, a bit more perspective about it. And that doesn’t mean that you do this once. And the next time, Hey, I’m chilled about it. You know, cut me off. Do whatever. No, but you’ll get slightly better and you’ll do it again and you get slightly better and you’ll do it again. You get slightly better. And so this is called progress, right? So as long as you’re progressing, it doesn’t matter if you’ve gone from here to here, it’s progress. You don’t have to go from here to here.

Lauren: Progress is better than perfect.

Tony: Every time a hundred percent progress beats perfection. And so this is just about progressing. And the more that you do this, and you touched on the beautiful world earlier, which is habit. You create the habit to reflect on your day, to ask yourself those two questions. And you doesn’t have to be the end of the day. It can be E as in a sales call. Perhaps as a HR manager, maybe you’ve had a difficult employee conversation. Ask yourself, Hey, what did I do well in that conversation? What could I improve in that conversation? All right, so you’re asking yourself those sorts of questions. If you’re a manager who’s just run a team meeting, ask yourself, Hey, what went well in that team meeting? Right? And so you don’t need to ask these things out loud, walk around the office and Hey, what went well? You know, and it, you know, you just, you can have that internal, you have an internal dialogue.

Lauren: And what do you think about probably make this my last question but in terms of those reflections and that habit of, you know, what’s going well and what would I do differently next time? Do you think it’s more powerful to have that written down somewhere that you can refer back to? Or is it more a thing that you just do in the moment?

Tony: Writing is excellent. Right? So it, because it’s reinforcing. So it’s one thing to think about it, but now when I write it now, when I see it now, when I read it, that makes sense. I’ve gone from doing one step to now I’ve done four steps.

Lauren: Which means four cycles. Fantastic.

Tony: Correct. And so, and so, whether it be on the positive side or the corrective side, I’ve gone and reinforced that. And again, this is what this is doing and this is elevating things from our subconscious to our conscious and we’re in our conscious then it’s about, I now have the choice in our subconscious. I don’t have the choice because I’m operating on default. I’m doing things automatically when it comes into my conscious. Now I have the choice. I can still choose to do nothing different, but it’s, but I have the choice or I could choose to go, huh, I want to be better tomorrow than I am today and I’m going to do something different.

Lauren: Fantastic. Alright. Well I had could ask so many more questions. Sure. Goals in life and all that sort of thing. But we might wrap it up. Okay. If I wanted to know more about goal setting or effective processes, is there any resources that you got for that?

Tony: There’s heaps of resources that I’ve got. So firstly I’ve got social media pages, Tony Meredith coaching on Facebook, on Instagram on LinkedIn, Tony Meredith, the YouTube, Tony Meredith. But I’ve also got a 12 page goal-setting playbook that I’ve written that are giving away to people for free to help them with that. It walks them through the exact process that I use with our clients. And so people can do this in their own pace and it’s all about, again, starting with the Indian, Melinda touched on it earlier but then it’s about working backwards. So working backwards. So when you have a 12 month goal, where do you want to be in six months, where you want to be in three months? Where you want to be one month, two weeks, one week, etcetera. And so start with end in mind, work your way backwards. That is you’re creating the plan and then obviously you work in a Ford direction to activate on that plan. And I suppose the thing is, I just want to finish on Lauren with goal setting is fine, but ultimately it’s goal achievement. Yes. Right.

Lauren: Setting review to make it actually happen.

Tony: You can have the most well-written down plans in the world that can be beautifully presented. But again, if you aren’t activating on that plan, what does it matter? And it goes back to the point I said earlier about knowledge. To know not to do is to not know at all. You can apply that similar saying to goal setting, you can have a well-written out goal. If you’re not doing anything with it, then it doesn’t matter. Absolutely. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it.

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